Power developments in Africa, February 2018

Dual-fuel power plant for Ghana

Amandi IPP is a 200 MW dual-fuel combined-cycle power plant which achieved financial close in December 2016 and is currently under construction in Ghana. It claims to be the only large-scale base-load independent power generation project in sub-Saharan Africa. The power plant will assist Ghana in reaching its near-term goals of increasing its power generating capacity to 5000 MW. African Infrastructure Investment Managers has acquired a minority stake in the Amandi IPP power, which is being financed through its third pan-African focused fund, African Infrastructure Investment Fund 3.


Côte d’Ivoire hydropower project

The Côte d’Ivoire Singrobo-Ahouaty project involves the design, construction and operation of a 44 MW hydropower plant on the Bandama River. The country’s dynamic economy is exerting pressure on power supply, with demand projected to grow by 8 to 9% annually. To meet rising domestic and regional demand, Côte d’Ivoire intends to significantly raise its generation capacity, including hydropower. The project is funded by the African Development Bank which invested in 1,4 GW of additional generation capacity exclusively from renewable energy sources during 2017.


50 MW solar power for Mali

The Akuo Kita Solar power plant will be built at Kita in southern Mali. It will be the first photovoltaic power station in Mali owned and run by a private sector independent power producer. The 50 MW project includes transmission infrastructure connecting to the local electricity grid. Akuo Kita Solar will sell its power to the national utility under a 28-year power purchase agreement. Less than 5-million of Mali’s 18-million population have access to electricity.


Azito power plant to increase its output

The Azito combined-cycle power plant near Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, will have technical improvements to increase its capacity and improve its availability while reducing CO2 emissions. The existing power plant has an installed capacity of 430 MW and supplies 25% of Côte d’Ivoire’s electricity. Once the technical improvements have been made, the plant’s capacity will increase by around 30 MW. With planned annual production of 3130 GWh, the improvements will increase the efficiency of the power plant.


Morocco’s CSP exceeds targets

Morocco’s 160 MW Noor 1 parabolic trough power plant exceeded its objectives in year one and brought stability to Morocco’s power grid. The Ouarzazate CSP complex will be the largest CSP complex in the world. Noor 2 and Noor 3, the second and third phases, will have 200 and 150 MW capacity respectively. Noor 1 has three hours of thermal energy storage. Noor 2, also based on parabolic trough technology, will have six hours of storage, and Noor 3, with its 250 m power tower, will have seven-and-a-half hours of storage capacity.


Solar PV for Rwanda

A solar photovoltaic project in Rwanda has received a loan of $15-million from the Abu Dhabi Fund for Development (ADFD). The loan will contribute to the installation of 500 000 off-grid solar PV home systems across the country, providing electricity for lighting, mobile phone and radio charging. The project is a major part of the government’s rural electrification strategy and employs a flexible mobile payment platform. More than 2,5-million people in rural communities will benefit from improved electricity access, and more than 2000 local jobs will be created.


Solar PV for Rwanda

A solar photovoltaic project in Rwanda has received a loan of $15-million from the Abu Dhabi Fund for Development (ADFD). The loan will contribute to the installation of 500 000 off-grid solar PV home systems across the country, providing electricity for lighting, mobile phone and radio charging. The project is a major part of the government’s rural electrification strategy and employs a flexible mobile payment platform. More than 2,5-million people in rural communities will benefit from improved electricity access, and more than 2000 local jobs will be created.


Zambia to increase solar generation

Zambia received a US$2,8-million guarantee from the World Bank to increase its solar photovoltaic electricity generation capacity and diversify the country’s primary energy sources. The guarantee will leverage approximately $48-million in private sector-led investment that will support the development of a 34 MW peak solar PV power plant by Ngonye Power. The plant will be situated in the Lusaka South Multi-Facility Economic Zone. The guarantee for the Ngonye project is in addition to a similar facility for the West Lunga solar PV project, located in the same area.


Waste-to-energy in Kenya

A 10 MW grid-connected municipal waste-to-energy (WTE) plant will be constructed Kibera, Kenya. The plant will generate electricity from municipal solid waste by converting it to biogas/fuel ethanol, with significant health, social and development benefits. The Sustainable Energy Fund for Africa (SEFA) approved the grant of US$995 000 to Asticom Kenya to conduct a full environmental and social impact assessment, detailed engineering designs, and provide project-related legal advisory services, as well as financial/transaction advisory services.


Nuclear power for Egypt

The construction of the El Dabaa nuclear power plant (NPP) in Egypt is set to begin soon. Rosatom will build four VVER-1200 units of the NPP in the Matrouh region on the Mediterranean coast, as well as supply nuclear fuel throughout the plant’s operational lifetime. The first unit of the NPP is to be commissioned in 2026. The 1200 MW reactor unit is a Generation 3+ nuclear power plant that is fully compliant with post-Fukushima IAEA requirements and already implemented in Russia.

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